the mastermind and custodian of my own myth
Blueshirts Boulevard #BlueshirtsBlvd #NYR presented by Chase for an outdoor FAN FEST

on Sunday, October 12th on 33rd street btw 7th and 8th avenues. For more info and activities visit http://nyrange.rs/1rdXhN9.

*Event is open to the public, no ticket required for admission. Hours of Operation - 12pm - 6pm

RT @nprfreshair:

Talking about death isn’t easy, but mortician Caitlin Doughty is trying to reform how we think about the deaths of loved ones — and prepare for our own.
Her new book is Smoke Gets In Your Eyes & Other Lessons from the Crematory.
Here’s what she would like to see changed in cremation: 

"If I could see anything change it would be the level of involvement of the family in the death rituals. Because when I was working at the crematory, the most shocking thing to me wasn’t so much the decomposing bodies or the strange bodies that I saw, it really was that I was alone there. And I was sending all of these people off to their final disposition in the crematorium machine and there was no one there and it didn’t feel right because I didn’t know these people. And it was an honor and I took it very seriously.
But the time when families did come — and that’s called a “witness cremation,” which is something you can ask for at your local crematory or funeral home — when … the family was there and they sat with the body and they took the time and they pushed the button to send the body into the flames, it was an incredibly powerful experience because they took responsibility for that body. And they took responsibility for that death and for that loss to the community and that to me is the thing that we’ve lost and it’s most crucial that we get back.”

Mortician Talks Openly About Death, And Wants You To, Too
Photo: Getty/Darren McCollester 

RT @nprfreshair:

Talking about death isn’t easy, but mortician Caitlin Doughty is trying to reform how we think about the deaths of loved ones — and prepare for our own.

Her new book is Smoke Gets In Your Eyes & Other Lessons from the Crematory.

Here’s what she would like to see changed in cremation: 

"If I could see anything change it would be the level of involvement of the family in the death rituals. Because when I was working at the crematory, the most shocking thing to me wasn’t so much the decomposing bodies or the strange bodies that I saw, it really was that I was alone there. And I was sending all of these people off to their final disposition in the crematorium machine and there was no one there and it didn’t feel right because I didn’t know these people. And it was an honor and I took it very seriously.

But the time when families did come — and that’s called a “witness cremation,” which is something you can ask for at your local crematory or funeral home — when … the family was there and they sat with the body and they took the time and they pushed the button to send the body into the flames, it was an incredibly powerful experience because they took responsibility for that body. And they took responsibility for that death and for that loss to the community and that to me is the thing that we’ve lost and it’s most crucial that we get back.”

Mortician Talks Openly About Death, And Wants You To, Too

Photo: Getty/Darren McCollester 

RT @nprfreshair:

Jake Halpern grew up in Buffalo, which happens to be a national center of debt collection agencies. He writes that more than 5,000 people in the Buffalo area work in debt collection. In his new book, Halpern takes a dive into the underworld of the debt collection industry, where having a criminal background is no barrier to entry, and may sometimes be useful. He writes of a world in which batches of old, uncollected debts may be sold again and again to collection agencies, and may end up being worked by two companies simultaneously. Jake Halpern is a contributor to The New Yorker and the New York Times Magazine, and is the author of Fame Junkies and Braving Home. His new book is called Bad Paper: Chasing Debt from Wall Street to the Underworld.  
Dave Davies asked Halpern why phone calls to people’s homes to collect debts often come from agencies other than the company they originally owed.
Hear what he says. 

RT @nprfreshair:

Jake Halpern grew up in Buffalo, which happens to be a national center of debt collection agencies. He writes that more than 5,000 people in the Buffalo area work in debt collection. In his new book, Halpern takes a dive into the underworld of the debt collection industry, where having a criminal background is no barrier to entry, and may sometimes be useful. He writes of a world in which batches of old, uncollected debts may be sold again and again to collection agencies, and may end up being worked by two companies simultaneously. Jake Halpern is a contributor to The New Yorker and the New York Times Magazine, and is the author of Fame Junkies and Braving Home. His new book is called Bad Paper: Chasing Debt from Wall Street to the Underworld.  

Dave Davies asked Halpern why phone calls to people’s homes to collect debts often come from agencies other than the company they originally owed.

Hear what he says. 

stlcardinals:

Lots of heroes tonight, but Kolten Wong played the lead role.

stlcardinals:

Lots of heroes tonight, but Kolten Wong played the lead role.

RT @NatGeoTravel: “Travel is really important because we, as humans, can get too comfortable in our own little worlds.” http://t.co/e3t8OT7Pfd

Arepa de Chocolo with Steak ($8) from @ArepaLady

Arepa de Chocolo with Steak ($8) from @ArepaLady