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#Barbie Dolls of the World: Realistic or #Racist?
There are more than 200 Barbies in @Mattel’s Dolls of the World collection, all dressed in costumes that pay homage to different countries. The collection debuted in 1980 with Parisian, British, and Italian dolls and is aimed at kids and adult collectors alike. But the most recent versions, especially ones representing Latin America, are causing controversy online. The newest Mexico Barbie, released in June 2012, has been rediscovered by Barbie enthusiasts — and is being called out by critics recently for being offensive rather than educational. “@Mattel, maybe #MexicoBarbie should come with a taco instead of a chihuahua- you know, just to be really clear,” tweeted Jennifer Morales on Thursday. “Of course #MexicanBarbie comes with a passport!” @SavannahLime pointed out on Twitter. “She doesn’t want to be deported!” After looking through the entire collection, we think the problem goes beyond the Latina dolls (the $24.95 dolls are aimed at girls age 6 and older, as well as adult Barbie collectors). Take a look and decide for yourself: Are these ethnic Barbie dolls stunning, or simply stereotypical? — By Lylah M. Alphonse, Senior Editor, Yahoo! Shine.

Photo by: Mattel.com

Mexico Barbie, 2012

The 2012 Mexico Barbie wears what Barbie Collection Designer Linda Kyaw calls an “incredible Barbie pink gown,” a single purple ribbon in her wavy brown hair, and accessorizes with a Chihuahua. But if Mattel was looking for authenticity, “She should have braids woven through with ribbons,” Adriana Velez, who describes herself as Mexican-American, writes at Cafe Mom. “She could have a white blouse with colorful embroidery and a woven shawl. Hell, they could have just called up a photo of the most iconic Mexican ever, Frida Kahlo, and copied the look. Instead they gave her some vague pink thing with ruffles.” 

 

#Barbie Dolls of the World: Realistic or #Racist?

There are more than 200 Barbies in @Mattel’s Dolls of the World collection, all dressed in costumes that pay homage to different countries. The collection debuted in 1980 with Parisian, British, and Italian dolls and is aimed at kids and adult collectors alike. But the most recent versions, especially ones representing Latin America, are causing controversy online. The newest Mexico Barbie, released in June 2012, has been rediscovered by Barbie enthusiasts — and is being called out by critics recently for being offensive rather than educational. “@Mattel, maybe #MexicoBarbie should come with a taco instead of a chihuahua- you know, just to be really clear,” tweeted Jennifer Morales on Thursday. “Of course #MexicanBarbie comes with a passport!” @SavannahLime pointed out on Twitter. “She doesn’t want to be deported!” After looking through the entire collection, we think the problem goes beyond the Latina dolls (the $24.95 dolls are aimed at girls age 6 and older, as well as adult Barbie collectors). Take a look and decide for yourself: Are these ethnic Barbie dolls stunning, or simply stereotypical? — By Lylah M. Alphonse, Senior Editor, Yahoo! Shine.

Photo by: Mattel.com

Mexico Barbie, 2012

The 2012 Mexico Barbie wears what Barbie Collection Designer Linda Kyaw calls an “incredible Barbie pink gown,” a single purple ribbon in her wavy brown hair, and accessorizes with a Chihuahua. But if Mattel was looking for authenticity, “She should have braids woven through with ribbons,” Adriana Velez, who describes herself as Mexican-American, writes at Cafe Mom. “She could have a white blouse with colorful embroidery and a woven shawl. Hell, they could have just called up a photo of the most iconic Mexican ever, Frida Kahlo, and copied the look. Instead they gave her some vague pink thing with ruffles.”

 

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