the mastermind and custodian of my own myth
1910: Carcasses of dead horses and other animals often lay unattended. George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress
Joel A. Tarr, co-author of “The Horse in the City,” estimated that the number of horses in Manhattan at the time was 25,000 and growing, and that each animal deposited 30 to 50 pounds of manure a day. Beyond that, the carcasses of dead horses and other animals often lay unattended, as did discarded food waste; there was no organized sanitation service. Manure piles stood outside stables and in the street.
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/07/28/nyregion/heat-struck-july-1852.html?emc=eta1&_r=0

1910: Carcasses of dead horses and other animals often lay unattended. George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress

Joel A. Tarr, co-author of “The Horse in the City,” estimated that the number of horses in Manhattan at the time was 25,000 and growing, and that each animal deposited 30 to 50 pounds of manure a day. Beyond that, the carcasses of dead horses and other animals often lay unattended, as did discarded food waste; there was no organized sanitation service. Manure piles stood outside stables and in the street.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/07/28/nyregion/heat-struck-july-1852.html?emc=eta1&_r=0